One
Navigation
 
Two
Annemarie Schimmel Kolleg

 

 


 

Project

Due to its geographic position, the Mamluk Sultanate (1250-1517) of Egypt, Syria and the Hejaz held the monopoly over the spice trade between the Far East and Europe and controlled of the holy sites of both Christianity and Islam. Its international status and leverage in the world of that time is mirrored in its far reaching and dense network of diplomatic exchange. Cairo, the Mamluk capital and largest city in the medieval world has been recently described as a “crossroad of embassies”. Gifts were the third integral part of diplomatic communication alongside the written and the oral messages.
This book is the first to document in detail the diplomatic gifts exchanged between the Mamluk sultans and other courts, revealing a so far unexplored aspect of Mamluk material culture and providing insight into the culture of gift exchange in the medieval Islamic world and around it. While descrbing the material gifts, the book narrates the political events in the course of which the Mamluk court sent and received gifts from European, African, Asian and Muslim monarchs including stories and anecdotes.
The study leads to unexpected conclusions regarding Mamluk the connection between gifts and commerce and Mamluk Art and reveals new aspects of Mamluk self-representation.
Practicing Diplomacy in the Mamluk Sultanate: Gifts and Material Culture in the Medieval Islamic World.

PART ONE: THE CULTURE OF GIFTS
Introduction
I) The World of the Mamluks

II) Protocol and Codes of Gift Exchange
1) Hierarchy
2) Hospitality
3) Monetary Value of Gifts
4) The Message of Gifts
5) Recycled gifts, used and requested gifts

PART TWO: GIFTS IN POLITICAL CONTEXTS

III) The Read Sea and Indian Ocean Connection
1)Yemen
2)India

IV) Africa
1) Ethiopia
2)Nubia
3)The Maghrib
4) West Africa (Mali –Borno)

V)Crimea, Anatolia,Iran, Central Asia

1) The Mongols of the Golden Horde
2) The Mongols of Iran: The Ilkhanids
3)The Timurids in Central Asia
4) The Turkmens
5) The Safavids
6) The Ottomans

VI) Europe
1) Castile and Aragon
2)The Cyprus Connection
3) Venice
4)Florence

PART THREE: THE GIFTS

VII) The Middle-Eastern Legacy
1)Traditional Gifts
2)The Fatimid and Ayyubid Legacies

VIII) The Mamluk Assortment of Diplomatic Gifts
1)Spices
2)Human beings
3)Giraffes and elephants
4)Balsam, Theriac and other local products
5)Religious Gifts
6)Textiles
7)The Knight’s Outfit

IX) Gifts and Mamluk Identity
1) Export and Art
2) The Iconography of Mamluk Gifts

Bibliography
Index

 

Artikelaktionen